The Progressive Era and the Family—Rothbard

The below is from Rothbard’s article except my statements inside the brackets.  The below is only a part of the article.  Richard Duke

“Another important insight of the new political history is that the partisan passion devoted by rank-and-file Democrats and Republicans to national economic issues, stemmed from a similar passion devoted at the local and state level to what would now be called “social” issues. Furthermore, that political conflict, from the 1830s on, stemmed from a radical transformation that took place in American Protestantism as a result of the revival movement of the 1830s.”

YOU  HAVE SEEN MY STATEMENTS THAT BELIEFS BEGAN TO CHANGE AFTER THE 1830S; AND THIS IS BASED ON MORE THAN 200 HOURS OF RESEARCH.  BEGINNING AFTER THE 1830sBEING SAVED AND BORN AGAIN WAS ALL THAT MATTERED. THE KINGDOM OF GOD WAS BEING DESTROYED; AND THE DESTRUCTION IN AMERICA IS ALMOST COMPLETE.  I say this ABOUT THE KINGDOM OF GOD over and over and over!—TO THOSE FEW WHO LISTEN. RICHARD DUKE]

The new revival movementswept the Protestant churches, particularly in the North, like wildfire. In contrast to the old creedal Calvinist churches that stressed the importance of obeying God’s law as expressed in the church creed, the new “pietism” was very different. The pietist doctrine was essentially as follows: Specific creeds of various churches or sects do not matter. Neither does obedience to the rituals or liturgies of the particular church. What counts for salvation is only each individual being born again“—a direct confrontation between the individual and God, a mystical and emotional conversion in which the individual achieves salvation. The rite of baptism, to the pietist, therefore becomes secondary; of primary importance is his or her personal moment of conversion.

But if the specific church or creed becomes submerged in a vague Christian interdenominationalism, then the individual Christian is left on his own to grapple with the problems of salvation. Pietism, as it swept American Protestantism in the 1830s, took two very different forms in North and South, with very different political implications. The Southerners, at least until the 1890s, became “salvationist pietists,” that is, they believed that the emotional experience of individual regeneration, of being born again, was enough to ensure salvation.Religion was a separate compartment of life, a vertical individual-God relation carrying no imperative to transform man-made culture and interhuman relations.“

https://mises.org/library/progressive-era-and-family